Skip to main content

News for all Arrowmen about what's happening today in the Order of the Arrow.

Centennial Update: Andy Chapman appointed Southern Region chairman

<p>When he became involved as a youth, he didn’t know where his path would take him, he just wanted events to run smoothly. The incoming Southern Region chairman, Andy Chapman, is proof that opportunities within the Order of the Arrow are endless. Since his involvement as a youth, Andy has had the opportunity to serve in a variety of roles throughout Scouting. As of this December, he’s excited to add the position of Southern Region chairman to that list.</p> <p><img alt="Andy Chapman" src="//oa-bsa.org/uploads/e-news/centennialupdate/andychapman.jpg" />The region chairman is an key adult volunteer appointed by the region director. The chairman advises the region chief, who is elected each December at the national planning meeting. Andy has already begun forming his team that will work to enhance the OA program throughout the Southern Region this upcoming year. He’s recruiting other outstanding volunteers, filling spots for the National Leadership Seminar and National Lodge Adviser Training Seminar staffs and helping to develop ways to increase Order of the Arrow High Adventure program awareness and participation. Beyond all of this, Andy is most looking forward to working with the region chief and seeing him grow in the position.</p> <p>Chapman has been involved with Scouting since Cub Scouts and was very active as a youth. He served as a senior patrol leader, camp staff member, lodge chief and actively participated in his section. An Eagle Scout and Arrowman of over 20 years, he still remembers the weekend of his Ordeal and being inspired to give service back to others. In addition to his youth service, Chapman has also served in multiple adviser positions within the Order of the Arrow. When he moved into the Southern Region, his new lodge welcomed him warmly. Right out of college he was asked to serve as an associate lodge adviser and following that served as Colonneh Lodge adviser from 2012 until December of 2015. Andy also has much experience with Scouting’s many trainings, serving on staff for NLS, NLATS and serving as his council’s youngest ever Wood Badge Scoutmaster at the age of 29. Along with countless other roles, he’s also served his council by sitting on the Silver Beaver Award selection committee.</p> <p>In 2015, Andy was the deputy chairman for scheduling &amp; facilities at the National Order of the Arrow Conference. In that role, he was tasked with ensuring no bumps in the road were encountered during the National Order of the Arrow Conference, where he was a liaison between the university and the conference. From his perspective, the conference went smoothly and the feedback was great.</p> <p>Andy encourages others to continue being involved, remaining persistent in our purpose and keeping both the youth and adults around us engaged. Speaking to all Arrowman, youth or adult, he says to serve as a role model for others to see and to be a positive influence. When following great advice like that, you’ll surely find yourself with the opportunity to serve in many roles in Scouting.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
Alibamu Lodge Builds Volleyball Court

<p>Ask any Scout or Scouter about his camp adventures as a youth and there will almost always be a reference to outdoor sports. These range from catch to ultimate frisbee and anything in between. The youth in Alibamu Lodge wanted to build on this tradition with the construction of a sand volleyball court. Alibamu leadership corps member Logan B. was the youth lead for this project.</p> <p>"Every year, summer camp staff challenges Scoutmasters. In the past, we have used a net and two trees but the leadership corps decided to add a volleyball court,” Logan explained. “A sand volleyball court was decided on because playing against Scoutmasters gets intense!"</p> <p>The project is set to be completed at the upcoming lodge event this fall, which has spanned over the course of two Ordeal weekends. Logan said the youth leadership in his lodge relied on adult advisers to help pull the project together.</p> <p>"We used our leaders to leverage connections to have the gravel and sand donated in whole or part. We ended up only needing minimal funding for the project and we actually ended up with a surplus of funds.” He believes the service provided will have great benefit. “Arrowmen have been with this project helping cheerfully from start to finish,” Logan recalled.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
2016 OA Service Grant Recipients

<p>Since 1999, the National OA Committee has annually selected lodges from each region to receive matching service grants. For 2016, 29 lodges in councils across the nation were chosen to receive a combined total of $50,000 in matching grants via the OA Service Grant program.</p> <h3>The following grants were awarded within the Central Region:</h3> <ul> <li>The W. D. Boyce Council, headquartered in Peoria, Illinois, will receive $1,000 to build a storage shelter for its mountain biking program at Ingersoll Scout Reservation.</li> <li>The Pathway to Adventure Council, headquartered in Munster, Indiana, will receive $1,000 to help construct an ADA accessible ramp for the Pine Tree Cabin at Camp Betz.</li> <li>The Mid-America Council, headquartered in Omaha, Nebraska, will receive $1,800 to replace multi-purpose shelters at Camp Wa-kon-da for weekend campers and its NYLT program.</li> <li>The Great Rivers Council, headquartered in Columbia, Missouri, will receive $1,100 to assist in building a new Quartermaster building within Camp Hohn at the Lake of the Ozarks Scout Reservation.</li> </ul> <h3>The following grants were awarded within the Northeast Region:</h3> <ul> <li>The Northern New Jersey Council, headquartered in Oakland, New Jersey, will receive $1,400 to assist with the renovation of the open air chapel at Camp Turrell.</li> <li>The Monmouth Council, headquartered in Morganville, New Jersey, will receive $3,020 to renovate the All-Faiths Religious Chapel at Quail Hill Scout Reservation, which was damaged by Hurricane Sandy in 2012.</li> <li>The Twin Rivers Council, headquartered in Albany, New York, will receive $2,100 to enhance the shooting sports program facilities at Rotary Scout Reservation.</li> <li>The Theodore Roosevelt Council, headquartered in Massapequa, New York, is being awarded $4,120 to enhance the facility and curriculum for its Cub Scout and Boy Scout STEM and Arts programs.</li> <li>The Juniata Valley Council, headquartered in Reedsville, Pennsylvania, will receive $2,300 to assist in the construction of a new Cub Scout shooting sports facility at Seven Mountains Scout Camp.</li> <li>The Minsi Trails Council, headquartered in Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, will receive $1,300 to remodel and upgrade the Settlers Camp Fire Circle.</li> <li>The Pennsylvania Dutch Council, headquartered in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, will receive $3,020 to construct a low climbing wall, with a perimeter fence and storage pavilion, at J. Edward Mack Scout Reservation.</li> <li>The Cradle of Liberty Council, headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, will receive $1,900 to assist with the construction of fishing piers at Camp Hart, which is the council’s Cub Scout Resident Camp.</li> <li>The Chester County Council, headquartered in West Chester, Pennsylvania, will receive $2,100 to provide high speed internet connectivity for STEM program offerings for Macaleer Lodge at Camp Ware.</li> </ul> <h3>The following grants were awarded within the Southern Region:</h3> <ul> <li>The Alabama-Florida Council, headquartered in Dothan, Alabama, will receive $1,500 to convert the OA lodge building at Camp AlaFlo into a multi-purpose building.</li> <li>The Tukabatchee Area Council, headquartered in Montgomery, Alabama, will receive $1,000 to maintain the swimming docks at Camp Tukabatchee.</li> <li>The Gulf Stream Council, headquartered in Palm Beach Garden, Florida, will receive $1,500 to help construct a multi-purpose recreational court at its scout camp.</li> <li>The North Florida Council, headquartered in Jacksonville, Florida, will receive $1,000 to assist in the construction of a multi-purpose pavilion at Camp Shands.</li> <li>The Coastal Carolina Council, headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina, will receive $1,000 to help create “Bohicket Towne”, a new program area at Camp Ho Non Wah that will mirror an 18th century colonial village.</li> <li>The Cape Fear Council, headquartered in Wilmington, North Carolina, will receive $1,100 to renovate the council campfire arena at Camp Bowers.</li> <li>The Blue Ridge Council, headquartered in Greenville, South Carolina, will receive $1,600 for the renovation of the staff cabin at Camp Old Indian.</li> <li>The Circle Ten Council, headquartered in Dallas, Texas, will receive $1,000 to assist with the repair of the hiking trail at Clements Scout Reservation.</li> <li>The Shenandoah Area Council, headquartered in Winchester, Virginia, will receive $1,200 for the development of the new Virginia Backwoods Rendezvous program campsite at Camp Rock Enon.</li> <li>The Stonewall Jackson Area Council, headquartered in Waynesboro, Virginia, will receive $3,320 to construct a new first-year camper program area at Camp Shenandoah.</li> </ul> <h3>The following grants were awarded within the Western Region:</h3> <ul> <li>The Redwood Empire Council in Santa Rosa, California, will receive $2,100 to acquire a 3D printer for the council’s STEM MakerLab.</li> <li>The Golden Empire Council, headquartered in Sacramento, California, will receive $2,300 for the replacement of sleeping tent platforms at Camp Winton.</li> <li>The Mount Baker Council, headquartered in Everett, Washington, will receive $1,300 to complete the initial ground work needed for the new Aquatics Center at Fire Mountain Scout Camp.</li> <li>The Great Alaska Council, headquartered in Anchorage, Alaska, will receive $1,100 for the new campfire bowl at Denali High Adventure Base.</li> <li>The Greater Wyoming Council, headquartered in Casper, Wyoming, will receive $1,800 to support a new aquatics area building for changing, instruction, and equipment storage at Camp Buffalo Bill.</li> <li>The Oregon Trail Council, headquartered in Eugene, Oregon, will receive $1,020 for the construction of a waterfront boathouse and instructional facility at Camp Baker.</li> </ul>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
Section chief hikes it up for OATC

<p>Ask any of the hundreds of current and former section chiefs and they’ll tell you the same thing: the job takes a mindset. Guiding every lodge in your section and being a positive example for thousands of Arrowmen means you have to be dedicated and committed to making your year in office the best it can be. This past summer, one section chief showed that that mindset can apply to anything.</p> <p>Mitch Leonard is the immediate past chief for Section C-3A, which is the home of more than 2,500 Arrowmen in parts of eastern Iowa and western Illinois. Mitch first considered a trek with the OA Trail Crew (OATC) - the service and adventure program for Arrowmen at Philmont Scout Ranch - after hearing of the amazing experience his friend Joey had on his trek in 2013. Being realistic with himself, he considered himself “not very athletic.” Rather than give up, as is always possible when considering a daunting Philmont experience, he decided to work on his own personal development to really make it happen. So how did he prepare for an adventure so physically demanding? Leonard says that it was a matter of starting slow and working his way up to the right place.</p> <p>“I started out by just doing practice hikes around my town and heading into different parts of it,” said Leonard, “I started without a backpack and after a couple weeks I started carrying one and began adding things to it, like bricks.” He adds that he also began preparing mentally by posting Snapchats with captions like “Week Two!” to have friends help keep him accountable. Mitch reflects that good friend Joey Dierdorf - the 2015 Central Region chief - motivated him constantly. Leonard says that after long conversations, he was reenergized in knowing that he could pull off the trek. “You’ve done all this prep and it’s not going to be for nothing,” Dierdorf told Leonard.</p> <p>Leonard had good reason to take it seriously, while some might not have been as motivated to prepare so heavily. He hadn’t prepared at all when having gone to the Grand Canyon in 2010 and felt the consequences when he wasn’t able to have much fun from being so tired. He also saw it as a great excuse to get in better shape.</p> <p>“I could see myself being out of shape and I saw this as the perfect opportunity to get in better shape, so this preparation was for OATC but also as a personal and mental challenge.”</p> <p>Last July Leonard started his two-week trek. Heading into it, he wasn’t sure what was in store.</p> <p>“What I expected was not what I ended up with,” says Leonard. “I expected it to be hard and very motivational, but it was much harder than I thought it would be. I didn’t expect to be as drained every single day and absolutely crash on my pad every single night."</p> <p>He noticed that as he went through the trek, although he was still tired, he wouldn’t really pay attention to how much distance the group covered and that he wasn’t always out of breath. This allowed him to really enjoy the experience and all the great views that came with it. Though the trek was hard, Leonard recalls the life-changing experience of “walking through God’s country on God’s time. I don’t get to see these amazing mountains or vast habitats at home.”</p> <p>After having the experience of a lifetime, Leonard strongly encourages every Arrowman to try it for themselves, saying, “If you want to do OAHA, just try it. There’s no way to understand all of the potential without trying.”<br /> The Order of the Arrow Trail Crew program allows any Arrowman to get the whole Philmont experience at a reduced price. You’ll learn about conservation and trail maintenance. One journey will end constructing switchbacks and working on erosion control, then another will appear while you plan your own week-long trek around the backcountry. Visit <a href="https://adventure.oa-bsa.org">adventure.oa-bsa.org</a>&nbsp;for more information about OAHA opportunities for summer 2016.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
What’s in a theme?

<p>If you attended the 2015 National OA Conference, you would be hard pressed to find someone who did not know the conference theme, It Starts With Us. This slogan represented a theme which radiated throughout the conference and sent a message to all of the guests and staff in attendance.</p> <p>Have you ever wondered what goes into creating a conference theme? Are you thinking about incorporating a theme into your next lodge or section event? Here is how the NOAC thematics team created the message for the conference, and some ways you can apply that process yourself.</p> <p><strong>Creating the theme</strong></p> <p>The thematics team was led by 2015 National Vice Chief Donnie Stephens. The team had the huge undertaking of creating a theme that would resonate with NOAC’s 15,000 guests, staff and visitors.</p> <p>To put NOAC in context, the team wanted to look at the different issues facing the organization so they sent out a survey to the OA’s top youth and adult leadership. The feedback from the survey indicated that the theme should focus on the future of the OA rather than its history. This data led the team to develop the thematic learning objective, or the message the conference should convey. That message was to create tomorrow with actions today.</p> <p>Once the conference learning objective was set, it was necessary to develop a slogan that would encapsulate the theme. The theme team developed a number of ideas and shared them with the 2014-15 section chiefs, who selected It Starts With Us. The theme and slogan were unveiled at the 2014 National Planning Meeting in Westlake, TX, where youth leaders from around the nation gathered to begin conference planning.</p> <p>When looking to create your own theme and slogan, talk to the people in your lodge or section, find an issue you would like to solve, decide what message you want to communicate to address the issue, and develop a slogan that easily reminds people of that message.</p> <p><strong>Incorporating your theme</strong></p> <p>Once you have the theme for your event, and a slogan to support it, it is time to make sure that the theme radiates in every aspect of the event. At NOAC, there was a thematic training session called The Secret to Ruling the World, which helped guests understand their place in the world and how they could make a difference. That was just one example of the theme in action: all of the nightly shows highlighted the theme, as did the speeches from BSA National President Dr. Robert Gates, National Chief Alex Call and National Vice Chief Donnie Stephens.</p> <p>Another way the theme was conveyed was through the use of branding. A ripple was used as a unifying image of the conference, and it appeared on all of the different publications, PowerPoint slides of trainings and different signage throughout Michigan State Unviersity. Creating a visual identity for the event-helped guests associate the ripple with the theme, keeping it at the forefront of everyone’s mind.</p> <p>Branding your event doesn’t have to be complicated, it is just a way to have people visually associate words and pictures with your event in order to leave a more lasting impact. Pick something simple and iconic; a relevant, powerful image is more impactful than a complicated brand guide. The best way to integrate your theme is to have a theme that people can get behind, and make meaning of for them. The more excited they are about it, the more effective it will be.</p> <p>Whether you’re planning a conference for 15,000, or a fellowship for 150, have a strong theme and incorporate it into every aspect of your event. This will add to the event’s impact. Guests left NOAC looking to create tomorrow with action today, which was focused via small acts of kindness with the #DareToDo campaign. Great event themes should likewise have a call to action — tackling a problem in the OA, or the world as a whole. Creating a theme will take your events to the next level, especially when that theme has impact beyond the event itself!</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
Joining the Centennial Campaign

<div><a href="https://oa-bsa.org/uploads/announcements/2016/Centennial_Campaign_Flyer.pdf"><img alt="" src="//oa-bsa.org/uploads/announcements/2016/Centennial_Campaign_Flyer.jpg" /><br /> Download the Flyer</a></div> <p>The Order of the Arrow's 100th anniversary was an exceptional time that will be talked about for many years. The historic Centennial Campaign to secure funding for a number of our high adventure facilities has moved us much closer to our goal. At Philmont Scout Ranch, a major expansion of the Philmont Museum and Seton Memorial Library will take place, and there will also be significant displays provided by the Order of the Arrow at Northern Tier, the Florida Sea Base and the National Scouting Museum.</p> <p>The Centennial Campaign began with donations from members of the National Order of the Arrow Committee, and this effort has now spread across the nation to hundreds of committed Arrowmen. Several lodges and one section have stepped up to make their contributions. In North Carolina, Section SR-7B has used a variety of activities to contribute to the Centennial Campaign including Legacy Fellowship to past advisers and a sporting clay tournament. Overall, Section SR-7B has contributed $5,000 to the Centennial Campaign.</p> <p>Three lodges have also demonstrated their desire to be a part of this campaign. Unami Lodge (Cradle of Liberty Council) and Witauchsoman Lodge (Minsi Trails&nbsp;Council) have each contributed $12,500 to the gateway entry of the Summit Circle at the Summit Bechtel Reserve. In addition, Wa-Hi-Nasa Lodge (Middle Tennessee Council) has contributed $25,000 to the main campfire ring at the Summit Circle. Any lodge wishing to contribute to the campaign will first need to make an equal size gift to their council.</p> <p>This campaign will conclude on June 30, 2016, allowing only a few months for you to become part of this historic and significant fundraiser. Contributions will provide the Order of the Arrow with a significant presence and impact at our high adventure bases. Are you going to join this historic endeavor?</p> <p>Please consider how you can be part of this campaign and our achieving 100% of our goal. For more information, please contact National OA Director Matthew Dukeman at 972-580-2455 or <a href="mailto:matthew.dukeman@scouting.org">matthew.dukeman@scouting.org</a>.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
Centennial Belt Buckle

<p>Back by popular demand... the Centennial Belt Buckle. Head on over to the <a href="http://tradingpost.oa-bsa.org/SearchResults.asp?Cat=66">Trading Post</a> to get yours today.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
Not So Long Ago, In a Lodge Not Too Far Away

<p>One of the toughest and most consistent challenges for any lodge is the ability to host successful events. An often essential component for an event, especially a fellowship weekend, is a unique event theme. The leadership of Sequoyah Lodge knew this, and after deliberation, planned their lodge’s fellowship around a Star Wars theme.</p> <p>It all started last May when the idea of a Star Wars themed fall fellowship was pitched to the lodge chief. The idea was approved, and the event was carried out from September 12-14. While the idea of the theme certainly had appeal, the success of the event relied on how the lodge actually incorporated the theme into its event. When asked about how the lodge mixed Star Wars into its activities, Lodge Chief Anthony Johnson stated that the lodge, “had both traditional and modern activities” which appealed to all attending members. Johnson elaborated by saying that there were teambuilding and confidence-building activities that incorporated Star Wars motifs into them. The lodge also set up several video game systems that allowed lodge members to play Star Wars: Battlefront, a popular Star Wars video game.</p> <p>Johnson claimed that the event saw a slight increase in membership attendance compared to other fellowships. He stated that the event was a big success and said, “It was the best one I’ve been to in a while.” He was pleased that the youth had a great time with the Star Wars themed events and that the adults were happy running the rifle range and other activities.</p> <p>One interesting addition that Johnson mentioned was the lodge’s policy to use dues revenue to allow brand new members to attend the fellowship for free. This certainly incentivized the new, enthusiastic members to attend the event, hopefully leading to continual participation.</p> <p>The leadership of Sequoyah Lodge realized that they needed a unique theme for their fall fellowship, and they took their Star Wars idea and ran with it. Designing their activities with a unique theme encouraged increased youth attendance. The challenge for Sequoyah now is to take the momentum and continue to provide unique, stimulating program.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
Profile in Unselfish Service: Tyler Allen

<p>The Order of the Arrow is full of opportunities to serve. 2013 Northeast Region Chief Tyler Allen found these opportunities within his own lodge and abroad at the BSA’s high adventure bases.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>What involvement did you have in the Order as a youth?</em> &nbsp;</p> <p>My involvement in the Order of the Arrow started in 2005, when I was elected at age twelve. Soon after the completion of my Ordeal, I became active on the Langundowi Lodge’s executive board, and served a few years as my district’s unit elections chairman. I served on many committees and was an active member of the ceremonial team as a youth. After a few years, I was elected to serve as the lodge treasurer, then the lodge programs vice chief and ultimately served as the lodge chief. Following my leadership roles in my home lodge, I ran for section chief in 2011 and was elected to serve as the NE-4A section chief. I held this position through our conclave and was reelected to serve another term in 2012. During the summer of 2012, I served as an Order of the Arrow Ocean Adventure foreman at the Florida National High Adventure Sea Base. That December, at the National Planning Meeting, I was elected to serve as the 2013 Northeast Region Chief.</p> <p><em>Do you have a favorite memory or event from your experience as a youth?</em></p> <p>It is hard to have one favorite memory, but one of my most memorable experiences as a youth was leading our crew up the Tooth of Time at Philmont Scout Ranch, in complete darkness, to watch the sun rise on our last day of the OA Trail Crew Program.</p> <p><em>Do you regret not doing something as a youth Arrowman?</em> &nbsp;</p> <p>My biggest regret as an Arrowman was not taking the time to experience our high adventure bases at a younger age. I made it to the Florida Sea Base when I was 19 years old, and I was 20 by the time I traveled to the Northwoods and experienced Northern Tier, and hiked in the high desert and majesty of Philmont. &nbsp;</p> <p><em>What is it that you would like to do later in life?</em></p> <p>I graduated from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 2015 where I majored in Geology. I became interested in geology after earning the Geology merit badge at a local cave. Pursuing a career that allows me to be outside, explore, discover and give back to the scientific community is very important to me. Following graduate school, I would like to work for the National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey or become a professor and work in academia. &nbsp;</p> <p><em>What experience did you have with BSA High Adventure and OA High Adventure before becoming the OASE director?</em> &nbsp;</p> <p>Before becoming the OA Summit Experience director, I had a solid background in OA High Adventure. In 2012 I served as an Order of the Arrow Ocean Adventure foreman at the Florida National High Adventure Sea Base. The following summer I participated in the OA Wilderness Voyage Program at Northern Tier and the OA Trail Crew Program at Philmont Scout Ranch.</p> <p><em>What is your favorite part of the OASE program? </em>&nbsp;</p> <p>My favorite part of the OA Summit Experience program is the trail building. The participants and staff of the OASE program have a wonderful opportunity to build “hike and bike” trail for The New River National River, National Park Service. The work we are doing for the National Park Service is very similar to the work that was done by the SummitCorps program in 2011.</p> <p><em>Do you have any advice for youth looking at OAHA trips? &nbsp;</em></p> <p>These OA High Adventure programs open each Arrowman’s eyes to the beauty of our world and let the participant let go of everyday distractions and experience the principles of our Order. My advice to those Arrowmen who have not yet experienced one of our high adventure bases is to not wait until it is too late! Go and experience the Order of the Arrow at work. There is always funding available through lodge and section scholarships. In short: don’t miss out!</p> <p><em>Do you have any advice for our youth Arrowmen in general?</em></p> <p>I was told once, “If you aren’t having fun, you aren’t doing it right.”</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For more information on Order of the Arrow High Adventure programs and how to sign up for this summer's sessions, please visit <a href="https://adventure.oa-bsa.org">adventure.oa-bsa.org</a>.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
History of Buckskin Lodge

<p>Buckskin Lodge, of Theodore Roosevelt Council #386 headquartered in Massapequa, NY, is a lodge steeped in history and tradition, dating back over ninety years. In 1923, an organization, dedicated to sincere interest in Indian lore, was founded in Camp Wauwepex of Nassau County Council. The founders, ‘Chief’ Howard F. Covey and Irving ‘Southy’ Southworth, created the Buckskins of Wauwepex, named after Dan Beard’s Buckskin Men. They focused on promoting advancement and learning for members, who had to be at least three-year campers who had also attained the rank of First Class.</p> <p>The Buckskins of Wauwepex underwent a change in mission during the late 1920s and became a service-geared organization with a foundation in American Indian culture and ceremony. With this, the Buckskins of Wauwepex became known as the Buckskin Sons of Wauwepex (or Buckskin Sons). As with many other councils and organizations that were beginning to appear during this time, the Buckskin Sons served an integral role within the Nassau County Council serving Camp Wauwepex and its Scouts. During the 1930s, Covey and Southworth were inducted into the Order of the Arrow at one of the national meetings. However, it would be almost twenty years before the Buckskin Sons would join the Order of the Arrow. Discussions began in 1948 and culminated in an induction of twenty-four Buckskin Sons into the Order on September 3, 1949 during the Area 2-A Conclave held at Ten Mile River Scout Camp. Each of the lodges within New York City was responsible for some component of the induction – call-out, by Ranachqua Lodge of the Bronx, Pre-Ordeal by Shu-Shu-Gah Lodge of Brooklyn and Manhattan’s Man-A-Hattan Lodge performed the Ordeal Ceremony.</p> <p>Buckskin’s traditions from its early days include the recognition of members with the tab. A tear-drop shaped piece of leather is colored with India ink to bear a pine tree with the silhouette of a wolf’s head. The pine tree’s points represent trustworthiness, service and self-reliance. The wolf’s head also represents self-reliance. The tab is only given to those inducted into the lodge, and only one is given per member. The tab was the main form of recognition until 1960 when a lodge flap was issued, bearing twenty-four Ws to denote the first members of Buckskin Lodge. The lodge flaps issued since 1960, with few exceptions of special issues, bear the representation of the first members of the lodge. The Buckskin sons also had a neckerchief of royal blue with a vertical stripe bisecting the triangle, denoting humble service. The red arrow was superimposed across the bisecting line to become the official neckerchief for the lodge.</p> <p>Buckskin also boasts a rich history of service within its section, with Joe Scalise being appointed section adviser during the 1980s. He received the Distinguished Service Award at the 1988 National Order of the Arrow Conference. Currently, the Section NE-2B leadership includes three Buckskin Lodge members: section chief, Kevin Shea; section adviser, Glenn Greubel; and section staff adviser, Matt Conlon. Additionally, Buckskin Lodge is home to the 2016 Northeast Region chief, Chris Boyle.</p> <p>Buckskin Lodge is proud to have a rich history of service to the Nassau County and Theodore Roosevelt Councils during the last ninety-one years. The lodge’s service to Camp Wauwepex, now called John M. Schiff Scout Reservation, and Onteora Scout Reservation is a representation of the dedication to cheerful service on which the Order of the Arrow was founded. Members of the lodge serve as staff members at both camps and provide countless hours of service to the camps for the betterment of the youth program within Nassau County, New York.</p> <p>Buckskin Lodge members have great pride in their lodge, and for good reason. Just as they make a point to carry on these traditions, they also set aside time to celebrate them. Arrowmen meet annually at their lodge banquet to celebrate in style. All attendees, both youth and adult, wear formal business attire as is the tradition of the lodge. Thus, they continue to cheerfully honor the Buckskin traditions of trustworthiness, service and self-reliance that their brotherhood has held dear for over 90 years.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
Staffing national events is a fun, challenging experience for Arrowmen

<p>15,000 Arrowmen attended the National Order of the Arrow Conference last summer. Over 85 percent of them took in all the sights and sounds, enjoyed the program and had the experience of a lifetime. Almost&nbsp;2,000 of those Arrowmen at the conference, however, were the ones who brought the sights and sounds to life, who conducted the program and who created the experience. They were the NOAC staff.</p> <p>Serving on staff for a national event is one of the most rewarding things one can do in Scouting. Many Arrowmen who have served on the staff of a national event find it to be a life-changing experience. Anthony Decatur, who served on the host lodge service corps, said that he desired to serve on staff at NOAC because he “wanted to see how things worked behind the scenes and make it a better experience for everyone there.” Not only did he get to see what happens behind the scenes at NOAC, but he learned what it takes to be a staff member. Decatur noted that staff members have to be cheerful in their service, quick to act, and of course, always prepared. From his experience, Anthony said that he “learned a lot of leadership skills” and “learned to work under pressure.”</p> <p>After staffing a national event, Arrowmen don’t just leave having learned lifelong skills, but also having met new friends from near and far. Grant Krull, an Arrowman from Shawnee Lodge in St. Louis, MO, volunteered for Adventure Central at NOAC with a few Arrowmen from Kansas City. What astounded Grant was both how similar and different he was from his fellow staffers. He noted, “We have the Missouri roots, but just a trip across Missouri and you get different backgrounds.” However, Grant didn’t notice this trend in only his area. With every other staffer he met, he noticed that “People come from all over, and they are all individuals, but we are all still a part of the same organization.” This commonality led to him and many other staffers making very strong friendships with one another. Mitchell Pierpont, who served on the museum staff at both the 2012 and 2015 conferences, said, “You can see some of these friends years down the road and it will be like no time has passed.” Pierpont also reflected, “These events are really like a giant family reunion.” When you arrive, and have to serve diligently with Arrowmen from around the country, you leave having bonded over a job well done.</p> <p>While these three Arrowmen told us about their time at NOAC, these very same experiences - and more - can be had by serving on staff at any national event. In fact, Arrowmen from all corners of the country will be gathering later this year to support NEXT: A New Century! Prospective staffers can navigate to <a href="http://registration.oa-bsa.org">registration.oa-bsa.org</a> and sign themselves up. However, if you’re looking for a more adventurous staffing experience, be sure to join the hundreds of Arrowmen serving on Operation Arrow, the OA’s staff at the 2017 National Scout Jamboree. Learn more at the Operation Arrow website. Experience what it’s truly like behind the scenes of a national event and register to staff at both of these extraordinary events.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today
Meet the 2016 national officers: Central Region Chief Logan Greene

<p>Logan Greene wants to connect with every Arrowman in the Boy Scouts of America. Greene, 19, was elected 2016 Central Region Chief at the National Planning Meeting in December, has a big vision for the Order of the Arrow in its second century.</p> <p>“We’ve really come a long way since the beginning of the OA,” Greene says. “So now that our centennial celebration is pretty much over, you think for a second where you want the OA to go.”</p> <p>Logan’s been thinking about what he sees in the OA’s future; As a member of the Central Region’s ArrowTour road crew last summer, he had the opportunity to travel the midwest and meet Arrowmen from all walks of life. That has played greatly into how he sees his job for this year. “Looking back on that past summer and this role,” Logan recounts, “they really, in my mind, correlate quite a bit. It was a unique experience to get that sense of what people want from their national and regional leadership.”</p> <p>So what did he learn? To sum it up: he wants to create a lot more of those experiences. Logan wants to dispel the idea that the OA and its group of national officers is “an elitist organization, and all that fun stuff.” He’s making it a priority to get out there and reach as many people as possible. Wimachtendienk -brotherhood- is the word that Logan has taken to heart.</p> <p>“We all share the same principles and the oath, Brotherhood of Cheerful Service, but we start with brotherhood. One of the big things with this upcoming year that we have to do is we just have to get out and have that conversation.”</p> <p>Logan is excited about two big events, NEXT: A New Century and Prism, that he had the opportunity to help plan at the National Planning Meeting. He’s trying to find as many ways as possible to listen to and work with Arrowmen from around the country. “Where do they want to see the OA?” Logan asks. “How can we as national officers follow through?”</p> <p>The NEXT Factor is one way our national officers are brainstorming for the OA’s future at NEXT. An idea partially parodying TV show Shark Tank, the NEXT Factor will give Arrowmen the opportunity to present their own new and innovative ideas about where the OA can go. “People are going to have an opportunity to come and talk to the region chiefs and we’ll be there just to listen and work with you guys,” Logan says.</p> <p>Logan is trying to reach out in other ways as well. Recently, he has been tweeting from the <a href="https://twitter.com/OACentralChief">@OACentralChief</a> account and he has a goal of making that feed his own. “One thing I’ve actually done, in contrast to previous years, is utilizing [the Twitter account],” Logan says. He’s been updating the internet on almost everything he does for the OA.</p> <p>Logan is excited about engaging as many members of the Central Region as possible in a way that he wouldn’t be able to otherwise. If you send him a note or ask a question, Logan says he’ll be sure to respond and toss you one of those new Twitter hearts.</p> <p>What’s the point of this whole campaign? Logan really just wants to “find that common ground” and relate to as many of his peers as he can. “Whether we both like football or we both like flying (Logan is working on a triple major in aviation), there’s something that all of us share. With that common ground, it gives us a way to understand each other. We’re bringing people together.”</p> <p>“I’m not just some person that people view a national officer to be,” Logan says, and that much is clear. After a summer on the road and an exciting couple of days spent laying out the next year of service, Logan is ready to lead the Central Region of the Order of the Arrow into a century that will be bigger and better than anything that any of us have experienced before. It started last December with Logan Greene, and he wants more than anything to continue it with you.</p>

Oct 29, 2016   OA Today