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Ceremonies

1944 Tap-Out Ceremony

Precious little archival film footage of OA ceremonies exists.  Finding a vintage ceremony in color is exceptional.  This film, provided by CrescentBayCouncil.Org, may be the oldest color footage of an OA ceremony.  It was filmed in 1944 in the great lodge at Camp Josepho, in the Santa Monica Mountains.   At the time Camp Josepho was a part of Crescent Bay Area Council and the seat of Tamet Lodge. 

2, Ceremonies, OA


2005 National Jamboree

The 2005 National Scout Jamboree was held at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia, from July 25 to August 3 with the theme “Character Not Only Counts, It Multiplies”. 43,307 Scouts participated in the Jamboree.

In 2005, the Order of the Arrow committed itself once again to assisting with the logistics and programming of the Jamboree. It was evident that the OA was solidly engaged in providing a tremendous amount of service and programs throughout the Jamboree.

3, Ceremonies, National Event, OA, Scouting


Elangomat Adopted

The Elangomat system for the Ordeal was introduced at the 1975 National Order of the Arrow Conference (NOAC) as part of the Inductions Enrichment Program. At the time it was a highly controversial method for not only managing candidate work groups during Ordeals, but also seen by some as “watering down the Ordeal challenges.”


2, Ceremonies, OA, Scouting


Campership Fund Created

The Maury Clancy Indian Campership Fund was created in 1971 to assist with funds to those American Indian Boy Scouts who wanted to attend resident camp. This fund was subsequently named in memory of long-time National OA Committee member, Maury Clancy. Mr. Clancy contributed significantly to the Order by emphasizing the significance of our nation's American Indian culture and he worked to encourage the preservation of our American Indian heritage.

2, Ceremonies, OA, Scouting


Brotherhood Rituals Change

In 1956, the National OA Committee, after consultation with medical advisors, determined that it was no longer safe to draw and exchange blood between two people in the “Blood-rite” of the Brotherhood Ceremony.

3, Ceremonies, OA, Scouting


Ceremonial Rituals are Changed

In 1933, the Grand Lodge was making the preparations necessary to become an official BSA program. In August of that year, a document entitled: A Statement of Principles Applying in the Case of National Approval of the Order of the Arrow, was produced to give guidance to the transition needed within the Order of the Arrow (OA).

One of the sections made reference to the Rituals of the Order of the Arrow and stated the following:

A competent committee will review the Ritual in its entirety with a view to assuring that it is free from:

1. Any words or phrases, which may cause offense to religious bodies
2. Any performance or expressions, which may be interpreted as acts of religious worship
3. Any employment of the element of secrecy as in obligation, which may prove inconsistent with the policies of Scouting.

Between 1933 and early 1935 the OA’s rituals underwent strong examination and rewrites to ascertain that the rituals were in compliance with the guidelines set forth in 1933 necessary for National Council BSA approval.

3, Ceremonies, OA, Scouting


George Lower

George Lower was inducted into the Order of the Arrow (OA) at Treasure Island during the second summer of Wimachtendienk in 1916. He was one of the two major contributors to the writing of the rituals used by the Grand Lodge from 1921 until 1936. Prior to 1921, Lower was one of the quiet adult forces within the Wimachtendienk. In a newspaper article in August 1921, he is pictured in a sash and black robe and identified as one of two Medicine Men along with Dr. William M. Hinkle.

3, Ceremonies, OA, Profile, Scouting


Ceremonies Principal Characters Change

Dateline: ---- Grand Lodge Bulletin, January 1, 1931.

Important! Attached to this bulletin is a very important list, which should receive consideration not only of the Supreme Chief of the Fire, but other members of the local lodge who may be interested. This is a sheet headed ‘Suggested Terminology for ORDER OF THE ARROW Officers.’ Please give this your earnest attention and write this office your opinion on it. The advantage of this list lies in the fact that all Indian names used are genuine, being taken from the LENNI-LENAPE dictionary. The term “Olomypees” and “Pow-Wow” are dropped because neither are Indian terms and are not found in the Delaware language.

3, Ceremonies, OA, Scouting


First Meeting of the Grand Lodge

In 1921 Wimachtendienk, W.W. (a common way at the time of referring to what we know as the Order of the Arrow) was ready to have a national structure. Patterned similar to the Freemasons, it was decided that each lodge would become a member of the Grand Lodge. On October 7 and 8, 1921, the first Grand Lodge Meeting hosted by the Philadelphia lodges, Unami and Unalachtigo was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and at their Camp Biddle. These meetings would later become known as National Meetings and are the distant predecessors of today’s NOACs.

1, Ceremonies, Elections, Founders, Goodman, Insignia, National Event, OA, Scouting


First Modern Vigil Honor Ceremony

According to Edson, he recalled returning to Treasure Island at the end of camp in 1916 where he and Goodman wrote the ritual for the Second Degree (then equivalent to Vigil Honor). Edson further recalled that Goodman was put through that ritual. It is presumed that this is the ceremony that Edson experienced when he kept his vigil.

There is no known copy of this ritual. Presumably the Second Degree ceremony was evolving just like both parts of the First Degree ceremonies were evolving.

2, Ceremonies, Founders, Goodman, OA, Scouting


Grand Lodge Changes Ceremonies

Dr. William Hinkle presented the following report to the Grand Lodge in 1921:

Report of Committee on Ordeals and Ritual - 1921

The committee on Ordeals and Ritual beg leave to make the following report:

3, Ceremonies, OA, Scouting