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Lodge Ledger: Centennial Blaze #15 - Expectations at NOAC 2015

<p>In the Pre-Ordeal Ceremony, Nutiket remarked, “fifteen blazes led you to us.” In January 2013, we began our Centennial Blazes to guide us all to this very special event. This National Order of the Arrow Conference will be like nothing any of us have ever experienced. All guests and staff members should expect to experience the Scouting event of a lifetime.</p> <ol> <li>Lodges can EXPECT a smooth and easy check in at their residence halls, as long as they have inputted all requested information (roommate assignments, training cells, activities, completed medical forms, as well as Youth Protection Training for everyone over 18) into the registration system by the set deadlines.</li> <li>EXPECT that some of your contingent’s adults will be asked to assist with supporting several of our staff activities. We call that provisional staff, a NOAC first!</li> <li>EXPECT to celebrate our centennial by honoring our past through the Legacy Display, the Centennial Rededication Ceremony and centennial sashes. You can also EXPECT to recognize your lodge’s Centurion Award recipients at a special reception. Finally on Friday, join us in celebrating our anniversary in style at the Centennial Festival. To complete your lodge’s display, please bring your lodge legacy lid and history book!</li> <li>Additionally, EXPECT to bring your crate of <a href="/article/ask-chairman-concerns-legacy-project-wood">kiln-dried wood, free of disease &amp; insects, not consist of pine and not be pre-burned</a>. The wood crate (given to lodges at the 2012 NOAC) should contain more than one piece of wood such that the crate is full (but not overfilled). The ash from this wood will be commingled with that of all the other lodges, Dr. Goodman’s Brotherhood Barn, the OA’s ceremonial grounds at the Summit Bechtel Reserve and Treasure Island Scout Reservation. Ash will be collected, bottled and sealed (only lodges who participate by bringing wood will be entitled to receive the commemorative ash vial).</li> <li>EXPECT to see each contingent member’s training and activities to be known in July (This if you input all the desired information during April and May). During one of your days at NOAC, your lodge will have the unique opportunity to participate in the “Day of the lodge” program.</li> <li>EXPECT the first ever OA Warrior Competition. Who &nbsp;can complete this massive obstacle course in the fastest time? Lodge members will compete for top honors.</li> <li>EXPECT to experience the first ever The Hub. The Hub will be the premier location for everything cool at NOAC. It is not merely a place, it is an attitude and a state of mind. All week The Hub will host so much of what will make NOAC extraordinary: the OA Warrior competition, the Centennial Fire, Adventure Central, the Hodag, the Centennial Festival and so much more. Located close to the Breslin Center, The Hub is more than a square mile of awesome and a place every Arrowman will find more fun and adventure than anywhere in Scouting. Make sure you plan your days at NOAC around The Hub.</li> <li>EXPECT the first ever Spark, which is a world class conference wide game powered by innovative technology that rewards Arrowmen for exploring NOAC. Spark encourages NOAC guests to make new friends from across the nation and allows them to take home and share their NOAC experience.</li> <li>EXPECT to be contacted by a member of the concierge staff during July to ensure that you are set for your arrival at NOAC. These same folks will greet each contingent at the five check-in locations on August 3rd.</li> <li>Finally, EXPECT a safe and fun-filled conference of almost 15,000 Arrowmen with a chance to make lifelong memories!</li> </ol>

Apr 30, 2015   Centennial 2015, Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: Centennial Blaze #14 - Welcome to NOAC!

<p>It’s hard to believe, but in a little more than four months, you and your contingent will be arriving at Michigan State University for the 2015 National Order of the Arrow Conference. To kick off the week, we have created a check-in process that will get you into your residence halls and checked in – all with just a few steps (literally)!</p> <p>If you have attended national conferences in the past, you may recall that check-in day started at a centralized place – generally a large arena on campus. This year, you will go directly to your assigned residence hall. That is your first stop! In fact, whether you are traveling by car or bus, you will pull up to your residence hall curbside to unload your gear. If you are arriving by plane, the airport shuttle bus will take you to your assigned residence hall. Before the start of the conference, your contingent will be provided with details in regards to your housing assignment, along with directions and a scheduled arrival time that will assure a smooth check-in for all.</p> <p>Following a quick health and safety review, you will be at your home for the week. The goal is to get you and your contingent into your rooms within a few minutes of your arrival at NOAC. To help facilitate this process, housing staff will be stationed in each residence hall on check-in day and throughout the conference.</p> <p>Once you are checked in, and your gear is stowed, you will head off to an orientation with a national officer to kick off the conference. The residence halls at Michigan State University are arranged into part neighborhoods. There are five neighborhoods on the campus – and each will have its own orientation session and other activities to welcome your lodge to the conference.</p> <p>In order to make this process smooth and quick, there are some things you can do in advance. The key is to have your registration information complete and accurate prior to your departure. If any of the following are not complete from the list below, you will experience a delay in your arrival and orientation process.</p> <ul> <li>Each guest attending from your lodge should be entered into the registration database.</li> <li>The roster in the system should match the Arrowmen you will actually bring to the conference.</li> <li>Medical forms need to be completed, uploaded and approved.</li> <li>Roommate assignments should be completed in the registration system by the assigned deadline.</li> <li>Training classes and activities for each Arrowman should be selected and entered into the in the registration system, by individual Arrowman (when applicable).</li> <li>Youth Protection Training must be completed by all Arrowmen 18 years of age and older.</li> </ul> <p>The orientation session in each neighborhood will distribute various conference materials and have program staff on-site to address basic issues with training, activities, special meals and other areas of the NOAC experience if needed. Details of this location for your neighborhood and other orientation-specific details will be provided prior to your arrival as well as at the time of your arrival.</p> <p>As you prepare your contingent for NOAC, there are three important dates to focus on:</p> <ul> <li><strong>April 1st, 2015</strong> – The registration system will open for you and the members of your contingent to choose individual training and activities for the conference.</li> <li><strong>May 31st, 2015</strong> – The registration system will close. This will allow the conference staff time to assign each member of your contingent to specific training and activity locations.</li> <li><strong>July 1st, 2015</strong> – The registration site will re-open. At that time each guest will be able to see what he or she has been assigned to prior to leaving for NOAC.</li> </ul> <p>By now you have likely been contacted by a registration assistant from the NOAC staff to assist you with the process of registering the members of your contingent. Their role is to ensure you have everything in order to register your contingent. If you have questions or issues with registering your contingent (including the online registration system), please reach out to this important staff member. If you have not been contacted by your registration assistant, please log onto the registration site and look under “Contingent Contacts” on the dashboard to find and connect with your registration assistant.</p> <p>A lot of work has been put into ensuring you have a great and welcoming experience when you arrive at the National Order of the Arrow Conference. We look forward to seeing you on check-in day!</p>

Mar 26, 2015   Centennial 2015, Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: Centennial Blaze #14 - Welcome to NOAC!

<p>It’s hard to believe, but in a little more than four months, you and your contingent will be arriving at Michigan State University for the 2015 National Order of the Arrow Conference. To kick off the week, we have created a check-in process that will get you into your residence halls and checked in – all with just a few steps (literally)!</p> <p>If you have attended national conferences in the past, you may recall that check-in day started at a centralized place – generally a large arena on campus. This year, you will go directly to your assigned residence hall. That is your first stop! In fact, whether you are traveling by car or bus, you will pull up to your residence hall curbside to unload your gear. If you are arriving by plane, the airport shuttle bus will take you to your assigned residence hall. Before the start of the conference, your contingent will be provided with details in regards to your housing assignment, along with directions and a scheduled arrival time that will assure a smooth check-in for all.</p> <p>Following a quick health and safety review, you will be at your home for the week. The goal is to get you and your contingent into your rooms within a few minutes of your arrival at NOAC. To help facilitate this process, housing staff will be stationed in each residence hall on check-in day and throughout the conference.</p> <p>Once you are checked in, and your gear is stowed, you will head off to an orientation with a national officer to kick off the conference. The residence halls at Michigan State University are arranged into part neighborhoods. There are five neighborhoods on the campus – and each will have its own orientation session and other activities to welcome your lodge to the conference.</p> <p>In order to make this process smooth and quick, there are some things you can do in advance. The key is to have your registration information complete and accurate prior to your departure. If any of the following are not complete from the list below, you will experience a delay in your arrival and orientation process.</p> <ul> <li>Each guest attending from your lodge should be entered into the registration database.</li> <li>The roster in the system should match the Arrowmen you will actually bring to the conference.</li> <li>Medical forms need to be completed, uploaded and approved.</li> <li>Roommate assignments should be completed in the registration system by the assigned deadline.</li> <li>Training classes and activities for each Arrowman should be selected and entered into the in the registration system, by individual Arrowman (when applicable).</li> <li>Youth Protection Training must be completed by all Arrowmen 18 years of age and older.</li> </ul> <p>The orientation session in each neighborhood will distribute various conference materials and have program staff on-site to address basic issues with training, activities, special meals and other areas of the NOAC experience if needed. Details of this location for your neighborhood and other orientation-specific details will be provided prior to your arrival as well as at the time of your arrival.</p> <p>As you prepare your contingent for NOAC, there are three important dates to focus on:</p> <ul> <li>April 1st, 2015 – The registration system will open for you and the members of your contingent to choose individual training and activities for the conference.</li> <li>May 31st, 2015 – The registration system will close. This will allow the conference staff time to assign each member of your contingent to specific training and activity locations.</li> <li>July 1st, 2015 – The registration site will re-open. At that time each guest will be able to see what he or she has been assigned to prior to leaving for NOAC.&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p>By now you have likely been contacted by a registration assistant from the NOAC staff to assist you with the process of registering the members of your contingent. Their role is to ensure you have everything in order to register your contingent. If you have questions or issues with registering your contingent (including the online registration system), please reach out to this important staff member. If you have not been contacted by your registration assistant, please log onto the registration site and look under “Contingent Contacts” on the dashboard to find and connect with your registration assistant.</p> <p>A lot of work has been put into ensuring you have a great and welcoming experience when you arrive at the National Order of the Arrow Conference. We look forward to seeing you on check-in day!</p>

Mar 26, 2015   Centennial 2015, Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: Centennial Blaze #13 - The 2015 NOAC theme

<p>This August, 15,000 Arrowmen will gather at the National OA Conference to celebrate our Order’s centennial anniversary. Guests can expect the 2015 NOAC theme, It Starts With Us, to be central to many of the activities, shows and training opportunities at the conference.<br /> <br /> Under the leadership of National Vice Chief Donnie Stephens, each conference committee is expected to integrate the conference theme, It Starts With Us, and the conference learning objective, “create tomorrow with action today,” into the programs they will put on for conference guests. The leadership of this conference will work to make the theme come to life for all Arrowmen in attendance more than any conference before.<br /> <br /> 100 years after one man’s idea that people should live a life dedicated to the service of others rippled into the Order as we know it today, a new generation of Scouts will spend 100 hours contemplating how our actions define what tomorrow looks like, beginning with the 100 days after the conference.<br /> <br /> Just as a band of brothers created and performed a small ceremony in 1915 that rippled into an organization that has impacted the lives of millions, the group of guests and staff at NOAC 2015 will individually contribute to the Order’s next century of service. This will create a forceful movement that when combined together, with the actions of others, will determine what starts with us.<br /> <br /> The 2015 NOAC theme was revealed during the 2014 National Planning Meeting. Additional information on the theme is available on the <a href="http://event.oa-bsa.org/events/n2015/conf/noac2015theme.htm">theme announcement page</a>.</p>

Lodge Ledger: Centennial Blaze #12 - Approving and Ordering Arrowman Service Award

<p>The <a href="/article/centennial-update-arrowman-service-award-launch">Arrowman Service Award (ASA) launched on July 16th, 2014</a> - the Order of the Arrow’s 99th anniversary -&nbsp;in an effort to recognize those Arrowmen who seek to recommit themselves to the principles of the Order, support their local units and councils and participate in the centennial celebration. Those Arrowmen who earn the award will be able to wear the official ASA patch directly on their sash. Arrowmen, both youth and adult, must work to complete a set of requirements across three categories to earn the award. There are also a few steps that must be completed following the completion of these requirements before the recipient actually receives the Arrowman Service Award patch.</p> <p>To start, the Arrowman working towards the ASA must present his completed requirement card with all supporting signatures to his or her lodge adviser. The lodge adviser is the key person to determine if the requirements have been met successfully, and will grant the award as appropriate. Arrowmen can work towards the Arrowman Service Award until December 31st, 2015. There is no limit to the number of awards that the lodge can grant, as long as each recipient is determined to have earned the award completely.</p> <p>Lodge advisers and staff advisers can order the Arrowman Service Award patches from the national office. This form can be e-mailed, mailed, or faxed to the national OA office at the addresses found on the form. Lodges can order a number of patches appropriate for the anticipated number of lodge members who will earn the award, and can place additional orders as needed. The cost per patch is $2.50, and the total amount of the order will be billed to the council of the lodge placing the order.</p> <p>The Arrowman Service Award provides the means through which every Arrowman across the Order can recommit himself to the principles of the Order of the Arrow as we work to perpetuate them into the next century. Lodges are encouraged to familiarize themselves with these approval and ordering processes for the award and to promote the earning of the award at lodge events and executive committee meetings. Don’t let the opportunity to earn this historic award pass you by!</p>

Jan 21, 2015   Centennial 2015, Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: Centennial Blaze #11 - The Centurion Award

For nearly 100 years, the Order of the Arrow has purposefully recognized Scouts and Scouters who best exemplify the Scout Oath and Law in their daily lives.

Jan 09, 2015   Centennial 2015, Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: Ken Davis Celebrates 40th Year on National Committee

<p>This year, Ken Davis is serving his 40th year on the national Order of the Arrow committee. He joined the committee in 1974 as the first chairman of the Southeast Region and continues to serve today&nbsp;on the national events &amp; 100th anniversary committee. He has a Ph.D. in history and is well known for writing a history of the OA, titled <em>The Brotherhood of Cheerful Service</em>.</p> <p>Ken was given the task of writing a history book in 1974 by George Feil, the national chairman at that time. For the first four chapters of the book, Ken consulted a writing by George Chapman, the first chief of Unami Lodge, titled <em>The Arrow and the Vigil</em>. This was completed in 1953 and gave a history of the Order up to that time. Davis updated this and continued until 1990 when the book was published to commemorate the OA’s 75th anniversary.</p> <p>Ken was surprised as to how well the early records of the Order were kept. While there were some gaps in the information of the Order’s early years, Ken found that there was an abundance of primary sources that greatly assisted him in the writing of this book.</p> <p>In addition to <em>The Brotherhood of Cheerful Service</em>, Davis has also written <em>The History of Wood Badge</em> and more recently <em>Born at the Confluence, A History of the Philmont Staff Association</em>.</p> <p>Ken has staffed over 25 Wood Badge courses, serving as Scoutmaster on many of them. He has served as school director at multiple National Camping Schools, and has led OA Service Corps groups at jamborees.</p> <p>Ken has also received many of Scouting’s highest awards, such as the Silver Beaver Award, Silver Antelope Award and Silver Buffalo Award. He received the OA’s Distinguished Service Award in 1977.</p>

Nov 25, 2014   Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: Flaming Rebar a Unique Tradition in Menawngihella Lodge

<p>One lodge has been using rebar to add a unique flair to its ceremonies! Read about the origins of this tradition and the steps taken to design it.</p> <p>Many Scouts love fire. Whether it is staring into a council fire at summer camp, lighting up a stove for dinner or the thrill of watching a spark slowly take hold, fire is a key part the outdoor experience upon which Scouting and our Order is based. Menawngihella Lodge, located in northern West Virginia, uses this fascination whenever it holds an event.</p> <p>Lodge chief Larry Cogar says his lodge has used a large sign made of welded steel rebar at its council ring, which is then lit on fire, since the 1960s or ‘70s. The sign, a tradition unique to Menawngihella, sits across the lake from the ring where the lodge conducts its ceremonies, including calling out ceremonies and Vigil callouts, as well as camp ceremonies in which the OA is participating. Cogar said that it is an excellent way for the lodge to make its presence known throughout the camp.</p> <p>The process of making the sign required a considerable amount of effort but has resulted in a product that has served the lodge well for almost 50 years. “The design itself was really simple,” Cogar said. “First, pieces were welded together to form the arrow shaft, then the tip and the fletchings were added, and next came the letters ‘O’ and ‘A.’ ‘A’ was an easy one as you just added two more pieces to the shaft. The ‘O’ took more diligent work.” Cogar remarked that what happened next resulting from taking two pieces to a metal machine shop in order to form a half circle sizing of the same degree on both pieces. Then, they were welded onto the shaft.</p> <p>Lighting the sign on fire to achieve its distinctive look also requires a fairly involved process with multiple people. As Cogar described it, “The sign is a really hard material to prepare for use. First, you take burlap and cut it into strips about three inches wide and five feet long. Then, those strips are pre-soaked and then left to dry in the shade for 10-12 hours at the most. After this, you take the burlap strips and wrap the arrow. While you are doing this, another Scout is following behind you to wrap metal wire onto the frame to keep the burlap in place and secure it to the sign. It usually takes three people to light it properly, one in the center and two on the ends, so nothing burns out before another part is lit.”</p> <p>The sign carries a lot of meaning for the Arrowmen of Menawngihella Lodge. Cogar cited its uniqueness as a major reason for its importance, noting that the sign and the practice of fire hooping, which involves dancing with hoops that are lit on fire, both lend a very special character to the lodge and its ceremonies. He also discussed the meaning based since the sign has been used for so long, and said that, above all, the sign serves to remind people that they are chosen for the Order of the Arrow.</p> <p>Menawngihella Lodge’s fiery steel sign is a prime example of how lodges can give their ceremonies a unique flair that will touch and inspire Arrowmen for times to come. It also showcases the importance that unique and meaningful traditions, new or old, can have in shaping the identity of a lodge. Best of all, it appeals to a Scout’s desire to work in the outdoors with one of nature’s elements!</p>

Nov 18, 2014   Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: Centennial Blaze #10 - The NOAC Promotional Patch

As we approach the beginning of our yearlong centennial celebration, many Arrowmen around the country are gearing up for NOAC 2015.

Nov 16, 2014   Centennial 2015, Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: An Award for Easy Marketing

<p>Every year, the E. Urner Goodman Camping Award is often overlooked by many a lodge that could easily be recognized for its camping promotion efforts. The hiccup is failing to submit a completed petition.</p> <p>The requirements are simple in that requirement #13 of the Lodge Journey to Excellence must be met with 75% or better unit contacts for camping promotion plus a current <em>Where to Go Camping</em> publication within the last three years. With two awards to be made from less than ten petitions received in each region, realize the chance of recognition is pretty good.</p> <p>So, don’t overlook the opportunity! Fill out <a href="{filedir_39}uploads/resources/forms/eugcamping-2014c.pdf">this&nbsp;form</a>, write up your best promotion accomplishment and submit with your lodge recharter by December 31st, 2014.</p> <p>If your lodge is among those which most likely struggle with the <em>Where to Go Camping</em> publication, realize technology has greatly eased and enhanced the means of communication. &nbsp;Printed guides, while still valued, have been superseded by DVD’s, CD’s and websites over the years.</p> <p>These days, many lodges have found the best and easiest form of communication is web-based information sharing. Promoting camping should not be limited to something you can hand out; that costs money and takes a team of people to produce and distribute. The fastest way to update information is through the web. Use of Google Maps and links to camping site information – council camps, state parks and other venues – makes locations visible at a glance and keeps site information current.</p> <p>Promotion doesn't only have to be on a lodge website; it can encompass use of social media services, as well as photo and video sharing services. Lodges that struggle with camping promotions need to consider the easiest medium access that unit members have and target it in the most comprehensive and simple way. There's no need to rebuild the wheel here; the majority of the information related to camping in a lodge's area has probably already been written. It simply needs to be exploited.</p> <p>Building credibility as a lodge that promotes camping is not that hard. It means doing some simple research, and then sharing it in the best, easiest, and most of all, technology-relevant manner.</p> <p>Then, after a year of promoting, determine if it worked and submit an application for the prestigious E. Urner Goodman Camping Award. It's pretty simple; promote well and get awarded!</p>

Nov 16, 2014   Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: Trailblazer Adventure Camp Inspires Arrowmen and Cub Scouts Alike

<p>In an effort to reach out to Cub Scouts, Egwa Tawa Dee Lodge put on an event that kept them busy and excited! Check out what the lodge is doing to try and keep them in Scouting.</p> <p>One lodge in the Southern Region is going the extra mile to support our boys in blue. Egwa Tawa Dee Lodge plans and hosts an amazing event every year in the fall for Cub Scouts at the Bert Adams Scout Reservation, outside of Covington, GA. Entitled Trailblazer Adventure Camp, this annual event attracts over a thousand Scouts and visitors, with a little over half being Cub Scouts. Marketed as an all-day Saturday event, most Cubs often camp out with their packs for the weekend from Saturday to Sunday. Ultimately a service event for the Atlanta Area Council and Cubs in the area, this event also serves as Egwa Tawa Dee Lodge’s fundraiser event to raise money for the upcoming lodge year.</p> <p>The Trailblazer Adventure Camp included stations like archery, BB range shooting and slingshots. Volunteer organizations were also invited to the camp to give participants an interactive experience. Arrowmen from Egwa Tawa Dee’s 13 chapters powered the event, running activity stations, dressing in Native American regalia at the teepee village or simply greeting the visitors. At the end of the day, whether a Scout was learning how to fish or giving out packaged lunch to visitors, everyone had a smile on their face.</p> <p>Like many events of this size, Trailblazer Adventure Camp was not planned overnight. The lodge chief selects a chairman for this event almost a year in advance. By December, the lodge is already in contact with many organizations from around the area to come out, volunteer and support the Scouting program.</p> <p>“I know so many Cub Scouts, that when they come to this event they see the Order of the Arrow for the first time in action,” said Ben Milner, lodge chief of Egwa Tawa Dee Lodge. “When they become Arrowmen themselves, they’ll look back and see where they once were.” Milner himself reminisces the days of when he was a Cub Scout and ventured into Trailblazer Adventure Camp for the first time. Now having been part of the lodge for seven years, Milner proudly gives back with his lodge the service he can provide to the Cub Scouts. “We are teaching Arrowmen how to get along with younger generations since Cub Scouts today are our future tomorrow.”</p> <p>It goes without saying that what one puts in is what one gets out. And definitely, the Trailblazer Adventure Camp Chairman, Mark Owens, and Adviser Clay Milner, put in so much hard work and effort into making this year’s event a success. Together, they did an exceptional job and their efforts were praiseworthy.</p> <p>Milner said, “We are inspiring Cub Scouts to stay in the Scouting program. The next Cub Scout running around could become the [future] national chief, who knows?”</p>

Nov 16, 2014   Centennial 2015, Lodge Ledger
Lodge Ledger: New Lodge History Cards Available

<p><u><strong>Lodge Card Available to Lodge Historians</strong></u></p> <p>Cards with important lodge information had been considered lost. That was until national committee member Bill Topkis asked OA Associate Director Matt Dukeman if he had seen anything like the only known surviving card, which was for Papago Lodge. Matt instantly recognized the card and passed the lot of them along to the Order of the Arrow’s digital archivist. All cards have been scanned, and PDFs of the cards are available to lodge historians upon request. You can be sent the cards for predecessor lodges as well.</p> <p>The top of the card includes the lodge name and number, council name, original charter date and a description of the lodge totem. For the years 1951-1964 there are pieces of data filled in for the lodge chief’s name and address as well as membership breakdowns between Ordeal, Brotherhood, Vigil Honor, new membership, active membership and a cumulative total.</p> <p>For lodges that do not yet have a complete list of lodge chiefs, this card can potentially answer some questions. However, what if your lodge already has a completed list of lodge chiefs and knows all of the other information on the card? The suggestion is for lodge historians to try and speak with past lodge chiefs as they can serve as a wonderful primary source. Through talking with your previous chiefs, your lodge’s historians might be able to uncover leads on further information and stories about your lodge!</p> <p>Lodge historians can request their lodge’s card via <a href="mailto:lodge_history@email.oa-bsa.org">lodge_history@email.oa-bsa.org</a>.</p> <p><u><strong>Lodges New to the Lodge History Book Project</strong></u></p> <p>For any lodges that recently began working on their history books, it is exciting that you are taking this step to record the historical narrative of your lodge. Though, the task of writing this history book might seem pretty daunting. You do not have to undergo this project alone! There are a variety of resources designed to help lodge historians with this project.</p> <p>Head over to <a href="/centennial/history-book">https://oa-bsa.org/centennial/history-book</a>! This page of the website hosts a number of resources, but first take the survey that is linked onto the page. This survey will enable a subscription to the Historian Gazette eNewsletter each month as well as the call-in information for monthly topical webinars. Webinar topics have covered such things as gathering resources, writing, editing and much more. You can view the materials from prior webinars in a Dropbox folder which is linked in the <em>Historian Gazette</em> eNewsletter.</p> <p>Other resources housed on the “<a href="/centennial/history-book" target="_blank">Lodge History Book</a>” page of the national OA website include a set of instructions. These instructions cover the steps of the project as well as provide some sample histories. The “<a href="/uploads/events/100th/Lodge_History_Book-_Getting_Started_Flyer.pdf" target="_blank">Getting Started</a>” flyer&nbsp;overviews the steps to successfully completing the history book. The bottom of the page has additional resources from which lodges and sections are highly encouraged to take advantage.</p> <p>When your book is complete, the “<a href="/centennial/history-book" target="_blank">Lodge History Book</a>” page of the website is where you will want to go to submit the electronic copy of your history book for the OA archives. The last useful tidbit on the website is the email address to which you can send any questions about the project,&nbsp;<a href="mailto:lodge_history@email.oa-bsa.org">lodge_history@email.oa-bsa.org</a>.</p> <p>Again, we commend you for starting this project. We hope that you discover interesting information for your book, which will be preserved the benefit of Arrowmen now and Arrowmen of the future!</p>

Oct 29, 2014   Centennial 2015, Lodge Ledger